Day 2 22/7/2015

Market day in Bury St Edmunds. Being able to hear the cries of the market traders through the open window of the gallery adds a new dimension to the exhibition. A large percentage of my work is about home and belonging. The market in Bury is such an integral part of the town and a sound that I have always associated with home. I usually take it for granted, but somehow the cries and bustle of the people below are amplified within the high-walled, gallery setting and resonate around the room becoming part of the exhibition itself. 
I struggle to get any work done at all thismorning due to a never ending stream of visitors. It's lovely that so many people I know are coming in to see me. Even the practise nurse from my GP, who gave me a tetanus jab and a course of antibiotics on Monday after I was bitten by a dog, came in to see me with her husband and grand-daughter. They notice straight away that 'Badlands, Olympic Park' is a painting of the flats used by the athletes during the 2012 Olympics. They notice it because they were at the same Bruce Springsteen concert as I was when I took the original photograph I then used to produce the painting. They also remember the sunset and how it shone on those buildings momentarily transforming them into a thing of beauty. If I hadn't been bitten by a dog, they would never have come in and seen the painting. Such is life. Sarah, a printmaker, comes in and tells me my work reminds her a bit of Agnes Martin, who I've not heard of but look up to find that she has a retrospective at the Tate at the moment. Her paintings are all grid-based and more abstract than my work, but I can see myself moving towards that end. It's really interesting hearing what my work makes other people think of. Before lunch I manage to tape Angie's commission piece and get one colour mix painted at least. 
The afternoon is quieter. People come into town early on a market day to get their veg and bread and meat for the rest of the week. While I'm painting I watch/listen to Jonathan Meades 'Bunkers, Brutalism and Bloodymindedness' which makes me think again about the walk we did on Sunday from Bawdsey Quay, up the coast path, in land to Alderton and back to Bawdsey Quay. All along the Suffolk coast are remnants from the Second World War, but particularly along this stretch near Felixstowe. On our walk alone we passed 5 Martello towers and a vast radar station. Took lots of photos of the Martello towers against the rural backdrop of Suffolk coastal wheat and barley fields. The contrast between the brutal concrete towers and the Suffolk coast exaggerates the colours even further. I've not considered painting them before but might look at them differently now, and see them as an extension of the Brutalism work that I am already doing. Brutalist beacons.
The only visitors I receive thisafternoon are Craig, Louis E Seymour and their little dog, Miss R. It's Louis' first week of living in the UK, having moved here to be with lovely Craig. I'm so happy for them both. 
By the end of the day I have blocked out the skeleton of Park Hill, it's concrete bones, ready for more colours tomorrow. 

2 comments

  • Jilly

    Jilly

    Brilliant reading.....😄

    Brilliant reading.....😄

  • Chris Waugh

    Chris Waugh Upper Bucklebury

    Loving the blog, Kate. It makes me rather proud to own one of your pieces, which hangs in front of me now as I sit and type.

    Loving the blog, Kate. It makes me rather proud to own one of your pieces, which hangs in front of me now as I sit and type.

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